Archive: Research Platforms

In 2010, CAN launched two platform programs - the Rapid Impact Platform Program (RIPP) and the Sustained Impact Platform Program (SIPP) - as part of its mandate to have impact quickly and efficiently by bringing together great minds from diverse backgrounds to address identified gaps in arthritis research and care.  Projects funded under both programs are well on their way and have already affected the arthritis community.  It is expected that the projects will continue to have lasting impact beyond CAN’s years. 

2010-12 Rapid Impact Platform Program (RIPP)

The 2010-12 RIPP was the first phase of CAN's Platform Programs. The aim of RIPP was to fund the creation of platforms that could impact the research community quickly.  Funded platforms were expected to develop tangible outputs (e.g. consensus statements, products, resources, and services) that would facilitate research. RIPPs were targeted at improving the research process and the sharing of research procedures with the research community. The development of platforms was intended to help CAN researchers harness existing expertise within the network to avoid "reinventing the wheel" through individual research efforts.

The 2010-2012 RIPP was intended to support initiatives that could be quickly implemented and utilized by CAN researchers. Accordingly, its focus was on supporting initiatives that involved bringing experts together (for example, in workshops and functional groups that would establish practice guidelines; standardize research processes or outcome measures; or assemble compendiums of knowledge). Successful RIPP initiatives were to create tangible products (e.g. white papers, standard operating procedures/guidelines and/or resources) and bring direct research value to a significant number of CAN investigators. The RIPP was not aimed at creating products and services for patients or healthcare providers.

2010-12 Sustained Impact Platform Program (SIPP)

The 2010-12 SIPP was the second phase of CAN's Platform Program. The development of the platforms was intended to help CAN researchers harness existing expertise within the Network to avoid "reinventing the wheel" through individual research efforts. The aim of SIPP was to fund the creation and provision of resources and services that would facilitate research and the utilization of research results. SIPP was intended to support initiatives that require a longer development phase, but whose utility would be broadly applicable and have lasting value.

SIPP initiatives could draw on expertise from any of CIHR’s four pillars of research (Biomedical, Clinical, Health Services, and Social, Cultural, Environmental, and Population Health) and involve bringing experts together to establish collections, standardize research processes or services, or create new community resources of common need. Successfully funded SIPP initiatives have created tangible products (e.g. resources and services) and have brought direct research value to a significant number of CAN members. It is expected that they will continue to make significant contributions to the arthritis research and clinical communities.